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Man-made heritage

Smelting Mill and Pond, Dimmingsdale

The smelting mill is now much altered and is a private residence, but the former mill pond is a very popular place with walkers in National Trust's Dimmingsdale.

Lead smelting mill described as new in 1741 and converted to corn grinding in 1784. Single high breast water wheel and three pairs of stones.


Alton, Dimmingsdale, Oakamoor
Spring Head Cover and Basin Tittesworth

A listed late 18th century spring head cover and basin constructed of stone slabs set on a troughed basin and fed by a spring (now a pipe) from the rear.


Tittesworth
St Edwards Hospital

Also known as Cheddleton County Mental Asylum, St Edwards Hospital was opened in 1899 by Staffordshire County Council to hold up to 600 mental health patients.

The grounds were landscaped and hundreds of trees were planted. The Asylum was a community in itself with its own bakery, butchers, vegetable gardens, sports ground and burial ground. There was an active social calendar for employees and patients.


Cheddleton
St John the Baptist Catholic Church

A listed Roman Catholic church designed by AWN Pugin and dated to circa 1840. The church is ashlar construction with edged herringbone tooling and a plain tile roof. It comprises a nave, chancel, oratory and chapel. It is sumptuously decorated inside (including much painted decoration).

SK07384244


Alton
St John's Preparatory School, Alton

A listed mid 19th century house, formerly used as a preparatory school. The house was designed by AWN Pugin for the 16th Earl of Shrewsbury.

SK07304247


Alton, Pugin
St Werburgh's Church, Kingsley

A listed parish church, the earliest surviving fabric exists within the tower and dates from the 13th and 14th centuries. The majority of the extant church building is of 19th century date (and includes work by Trubshaw and Lynham). An unusual wooden sundial is present below the church clock. A fragment of 12th century column in use as a trough in the adjacent farmyard may indicate that an earlier building once existed here. PRN 06293-MST11561


Kingsley
St Werburgh's Churchyard Kingsley

The churchyard around St Werburgh's church, which incorporates a cemetery of probable medieval origin. Three stone blocks, suggest the remains of a set of stocks, a bear baiting ring and a bull bating ring are said to be located within the cemetery.


Kingsley
St Werburgh's Parish Church, Kingsley

A listed parish church, the earliest surviving fabric exists within the tower and dates from the 13th and 14th centuries. The majority of the extant church building is of 19th century date (and includes work by Trubshaw and Lynham). An unusual wooden sundial is present below the church clock. A fragment of 12th century column in use as a trough in the adjacent farmyard may indicate that an earlier building once existed here.


Kingsley
St Wilfred's Church, Cotton

Formerly a Catholic church, St Wilfred's was closed in 2010. There were problems with the roof.

Said to be one of the architect AW Pugin's favourites, this is less ornate than the more famous St Giles Catholic Church in nearby Cheadle.

Stile House Farmhouse Bradnop

A listed farmhouse comprising of a late 17th Century section and a mid 19th Century section.


Bradnop

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