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Attractions

Churnet Valley Railway - Cheddleton

Cheddleton Station is located towards the northern end of the current Churnet Valley line and is the operational headquarters of the Churnet Valley Railway. It is one of only three original Churnet Valley Stations to have survived demolition in the 1960s and 1970s (the other two being Rushton and Alton).  Built in 1849, reputedly designed by Pugin , its existence today is purely down to the quick thinking of a member of Cheddleton Parish Council who prevented its demolition in 1974.

Churnet Valley Railway - Kingsley & Froghall

Kingsley & Froghall station is the current southern terminus of the Churnet Valley Railway, and the starting point for many visitors with it's large car park situated along the A52 at Froghall.

The station houses a beautifully recreated tearoom, as well as the commercial offices of the line. It is also licenced for Weddings and Civil Partnerships.

The railway hosts a selection of special events throughout the year, as well as its tradtional weekend running from Easter until the Autumn.

Peak Wildlife Park

Peak Wildlife Park offers a truly unique and immersive animal experience. Our large walkthroughs allow you to come face to face with exotic and endangered animals from across three continents. Whether you love lemurs, have a passion for penguins or want to wander with the wallabies, our park has something for you. The kids will have a wild time enjoying our indoor soft play and giant bouncy castle; whilst mum and dad sample our wide range of refreshments and delicious stone baked pizzas!

RSPB Coombes Valley

RSPB Coombes Valley reserve is a delightful oak woodland – especially in spring and early summer when lots of migrating birds come to breed at the reserve. Birds you may see on the steep valley sides include flycatchers, redstarts and wood warblers. There are a wide variety of butterflies to spot too.

Alton Towers

The house and estate itself, was called Alveton Lodge, or Alton Lodge, during it's early life, and was the summer residence for the Earl of Shrewsbury and his family. When Charles, became the 15th Earl, he took more interest in the house and its grounds, and decided to extend it. Work began in 1800, and continued, with major work being done, or planned every year until 1852. The lakes, and pools were dug by hand, and water was diverted from a spring at Ramsor, two miles away. In the years 1806-1807, 5,000 conifers, and 8,000 other trees were planted in the grounds.