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Man-made heritage

Horton Head Hollow Way (Horton)

Sunken trackway of unknown origin observed during fieldwork.


Horton
Horton Parish Church

A II* listed parish church of 15th century date, with 17th century alterations and an interior of largely mid 19th century date (following restoration by Sugden). The church is of coursed sandstone with a red tile roof and tower to the west.


Horton
Hospital of St John

A listed hospital, esigned by AWN Pugin in the mid 19th century. It is of ashlar construction with edged herringbone tooling and tiled roof. It forms part of a quadrangle with Catholic church and school.

Owned by the Birmingham Diocese

SK07384244


Alton
Ipstones Toll House

In 1837 the clerks and surveyor sumitted to the Trustees a report on the Cheadle turnpike roads. Among their recommendations was the sale of the existing toll house at Ipstones and erection of a house, gate and bar in place of an existing chain. This they argued would be a more convenient position. The recommendation was evidently adopted for there now stands a toll house at the top end of the village, where the road to Butterton Moor End is join by that to Foxt. the house.


Highways, Toll house
K6 Telephone Kiosk

Listed Telephone Kiosk. Type K6, designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott. Cast iron square kiosk with domed roof.


Leekfrith
Kingsley & Froghall UP Platform

A stone built railway station at Froghall, serving the Churnet Valley Branch Line of the North Staffordshire Railway. The railway has an adjacent stone built bridge.


Kingsley
Ladderedge Waterworks

Extant waterworks complex, constructed in 1849 and closed in the 1980s. Water from a spring fed a reservoir to the east of Sutherland Road 500metres to the north.


Longsdon
Leek Branch of the Caldon Canal

The Leek Branch of the Caldon Canal stretches form Hazelhurst to the Barnfields Canal Aquaduct at Leek. The canal was opened in1802 and was used for transporting (mainly) coal until the 1930s. It was finally abandoned in 1944. Restoration began in the 1960s and in the early 1970s restoration by the British Waterways Board & aided by volunteers was completed.


Longsdon
Leek Moorside Farmhouse Tittesworth

A listed 17th century farmhouse of coursed, rough-faced stone-work with some 19th century rebuilding in red brick.-No public access.


Tittesworth
Leekbrook Junction

Leek Brook Junction forms a 4-way junction less than a mile from Leek, once offering journeys in all four North / South / East / West directions. Built primarily as part of the North Staffordshire Railway Company's (NSR) Churnet Valley Line running North to South from Macclesfield to Uttoxeter that opened in 1849, it was joined from the West by a line from Stoke via Milton in 1867 followed by a line heading East to Waterhouses and Cauldon Lowe in 1905.

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