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Landscape features

Toothill Rock

STAND WELL BACK FROM THE EDGE!

For a panoramic view of the Churnet Valley there is no better place than Toothill Rock, but beware there is a steep drop and a very long fall.

The rock was formed because the Hollington Sandstone has greater resistance than the underlying Hawksmoor Sandstone - responsible for the valley's steep sides.

Trickle Ridge

Trickle Ridge is a ridge of limestone built up over centuries by a trickle of lime-laden water from a spring.

There is a spring up in the woods above that runs a very high lime content. As the water evaporates it effectively forms stalagmites along the ground so causing limey deposits to build up over the years into a ridge. 

The locals have maintained this one in a single route, that keeps building up higher. Just at the moment (April 2017) it needs a little work as the lower part isn't running - or it wasn't last time I went to the Black Lion!

View from Whiston

Looking over the Churnet Valley from Whiston on a winters afternoon while testing the "Plateway Walk"

Weaver Hills

The Weaver Hills are the southern end of the carboniferous limestone of the Pennines. As such the area is an important upland limestone habitat.

The Ordnance Survey trig point measures the peak of the range at 371 metres (1,217 ft) above sea level. 

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